Actually saying ‘You’


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* Let me know what you think of the lesson! Too easy? Too difficult? Anything unclear?

468 thoughts on “Actually saying ‘You’

  1. Tiago Rodrigues

    Hello! Great video! Appreciate it a lot.

    Would just like to point out a minor mistake . At the 30 seconds mark, on the board behind you, you spell out あなた but the word "kimi" is in front of it. I believe you wanted to reference あなた.

    Hope that helps!

    Reply
      1. Max Wonder

        Great lessons as usual. What I don't get though is how do you ask someone who you've never met before their name? You would normally say " You said that it's weird to say Anata, and that it's rude to say Kimi, Omae, and Anta.

        Reply
          1. sheep

            Probably "o-namae wa?" to be polite (plus it makes it sound more like it's about the person you're speaking to, as opposed to a third party, to me) or even more formally "o-namae wa nan desu ka?" but in either case there's no need to use a "you". Things like respect can easily get "you" across without ever saying it.

          1. Cali

            Yuta-san just said saying 'anata' to strangers would be weird because it's also a term of endearment for couples. So 'Onamae wa' or namae wa?

        1. Anonymous

          お名前は?
          お名前は何ですか。

          You dont need to use "something" in particular to refer to the other

          Reply
      2. Sharaya

        I know of Anata, kimi, Jibun, omae and temee. I Didn't know Otaku could be used like that xD I've never herd Anta.

        Reply
      3. Leticia

        I liked the lesson and also the lesson helped me to understand more about the language. Nothing was unclear. Thank you for the lessons.

        Reply
      4. Blake

        I don't know if this is where I leave my answers, but I learned about jibun, kisama, temee, anata, omae, and kimi.

        Reply
      5. Feiyuin

        I have read a manga with a man frequently using a phrase to start their sentence with something along the lines of 手前

        I would assume it is used in a rude gesture. But I'm not sure if it's pronounced as "te mae." Since I've never actually seen anyone else use it.

        Reply
      6. ton

        hello mr. yuta san, do (you) in japanese have plural or singular form?
        do you have video lesson about honorifics before? can you make one if you don't ?
        thanks

        Reply
        1. ハッチャー

          I think when it comes to plural forms, it is usually natural to know the scenario. You have words like 私たち (We) and 彼ら (They), but you'll usually know when you ask and you can clarify the amounts by asking 何まいですか. I hope this helps a bit. ^^

          Reply
      1. Anonymous

        I would recommend using そちら

        I believe that it's a polite way to say "you" and doesn't hold double meanings like あなた

        You could also add さま to the end to make it more polite.

        Reply
        1. Martin

          You probably shouldn't use -さま to make the sentence more polite. さま is way too overkill for a stranger- it's mostly used for people who have a way higher status than you, like i.e. god or the president.

          Reply
          1. Vigo

            Haha God or President is pushing it (talk to a lot of Gods, do you?), but yes, Sochira-sama is more likely to be used to a customer, or somewhere where there is a strong differential in status (or on the phone). It is unlikely a foreigner would find themselves in a situation where it should be used.

        2. DarthKazar

          そちら could be really useful BUT it might be sooo unnatural in a normal conversation even with strangers. Like Martin said, さま is only for God and people in a really high rank or status.
          So, just DO NOT use あなた, きみ or そちら if you DO NOT know the EXACT use and situation properly.
          I work with several japaneses and they never have used any of those even in really formal situations. It is better that way. Just talk facing the person you want to address to and if necessary ask おなまえは?and use the persons name with さん and you will be just fine.

          Reply
          1. DarthKazar

            Also use the rank of the person with the name. Like professor or embassador or president of the company, etc
            たなか-せんせい
            たなか-たいし
            たなた-かいちょう

          2. ユスラー・イクバール

            I'm just never going to say "you" for fear of being stupid. I've already been in a situation where I asked a kid if I could be his friend by using poor grammar and using 君.

    1. Bas

      Hi Yuta!
      Thanks a lot for the video! I am not that good at Japanese I think, but I'll give it a shot.
      Kimi, omae, jibun, teme, anata and that's about it I think. Also, I was wondering if you or anyone else here has a link to a place where you can practice the Japanese writing system, as I can only recognise a few characters in katakana but would like to get better.
      Again, thank you very much!

      Reply
      1. Abby

        Hiya! You should use memrise, it has courses for hiragana and katakana. It has a few for kanji but I would learn them in grade order as to what kanji Japanese kids learn in each grade, and yes yourself.

        Reply
      2. Cam

        Theres an app I have on android called "Obenkyo" and it's very helpful. It allows you to test yourself with the different characters and even practice the stroke order. It has Hiragana, Katakana, and lots of Kanji.

        Reply
      1. Marcio

        … for the longest time I thought "kisama" was a type of cursing… "kisaaamaaaa!" but they were just being passive aggressive "You….!"

        Reply
    2. Anonymous

      教えてくれてありがとう! The word you that i know, is exactly the same in your video. Anata, Kimi, Omae, Anta.
      Thanks again! 🙂

      Reply
    3. Janina

      Hey Yuta, I have a question..
      What should I use if I talk to someone and want to say something about them?
      Like if I said "かしこいね", how would another person know if I meant myself or them? And if I'm standing in a group but want to talk to one person (without weirdly looking at them) ?

      It's really weird for me not to say you because I do it all the time 😀 In German it's a necessary part of the sentence to mark the object or subject so we can never really not say it 🙂

      Reply
      1. Charidan

        It's easily derivable from context, although it might take a bit of practice.

        Don't think about just the sentence かしこいね, because with just that there is no way to tell who you are talking about. In any real conversation, there will have been something that happened right before you said かしこいね. For example, if you just explained a theory or an idea that you came up with, and then said かしこいね, you obviously mean to say that you (the speaker) are smart. However, if you're responding to something that somebody else said, you clearly mean that they are smart.

        If you want to start a conversation with かしこいね and there are only you and the person you're talking to present, you can probably just say かしこいね and your tone or gesture will indicate which of you that you mean. For example, if you're trying to ask your sempai for help on your homework and walk up kind of shy and say "かしこいね?" you're clearly referring to them. For an opposite example, if you just finished a conversation with someone else who is leaving and you walk up to your friend looking confused and say "かしこいね?" you're probably referring to yourself.

        If there are multiple people around and you don't feel it would be clear who you're talking about, just use their name. In English or German this sounds super weird, but it's the right answer in Japanese. One doesn't say "You're smart, huh?" you say "Mark is smart, huh?" even if you're talking directly to Mark and nobody else is there.

        Play around with it if you need to. Take those rules for speaking back in to German and talk funny to your friends. Stop using pronouns and only use names. Drop subjects from sentences entirely and see if people can figure out who you're talking about. It's not nearly as hard as it seems, it's just a bit foreign.

        Reply
    4. Etienne Venter

      Thank you! I was wondering.. what if you want to say something like " I like people like you" would it be wrong to say あなたみたな人が好きです?

      Reply
      1. 死ねば死ぬ

        A late answer but it would be said like this:
        「こういう人が好きです」
        "I like people like this"

        「こういう人」 means "this kind of human"

        Reply
    5. Kyle

      Rather surprised, I wasn't aware "otaku" could be used as a form for you. Also, in dramas and anime that I've seen, "anta" seems to be loosely used in a more scolding tone, like a mother correcting a child's mistake.

      Reply
    6. Sumalee

      I can only remember ever hearing kimi and jibun before. Interesting to know that there are so many ways to say "you", yet they're hardly used.

      Reply
  2. Shannon Leonette

    You (in Japanese):
    Anata, Kimi, Omae, Temee, Anta, Kisama

    Only know six… Hehe 🙂
    Looking forward for the next lesson, Yuta san~ 😀

    Reply
  3. Azra

    You've pretty much mentioned all the 'you's I know, so listing it down seems pointless. Although, I've never heard of 'onushi' until now. Thanks for sharing, by the way. I've been curious about kimi, omae, etc. for years! Finally, an explanation comes by 🙂

    Reply
  4. mila

    Thank you Yuta for your videos! They are appreciated 🙂
    I was just wondering how you would rather say a sentence like the one in the beginning (あなたは先生ですか。). I don't want to go around and 'shock' people with my ignorance ;)) So how would you rather say something like that as a Japanese…? Would you use the name maybe? eg. Tanaka san wa sensei desu ka? 🙂

    Reply
    1. Anonymous

      You would most likely ask for their name first.
      by お名前は?

      Usually we don't carry on a conversation without knowing each other's name.

      Reply
  5. Deniz

    Eh? You? I don´t use you, when I´m speaking in Japanese. I try to use the name of the person, I´m speaking to, or just skip you overall. My knowledge of Japanese ways to say you limits to those you mentioned in the video. あなた、君、お前、あんた、てめえ、貴様. But I know that あんた is typically used by japanese women , when speaking to their husbands.

    Reply
  6. Vaggelis

    Anata, anta, kisama, temee, omae
    That's all i know, thanks for the lesson, Yuta!
    However i'd like to ask you something.This was the first lesson i ever received since i subscribed recently, have i missed a lot of previous lessons?If so, would it be possible that you emailed me some of them?
    Thanks a lot!

    Reply
  7. Nick

    Yuta, do you have a link to the previous JWY video? I've been learning for a while, but I only recently subscribed to your list, so this is my first video.

    I'm wondering how to address a person I don't know besides using あなた ^^

    Reply
  8. Anonymous

    Hello!Thank you for this video,it's very useful.
    But…I have a problem.I can't find the video about that thing that you can't say "you" in japanese.
    Can anyone help me with a link or something?Please! :3

    Reply
  9. Julio

    The Lesson is very appropriate for a beginner intermediate level because even knowing most of these forms of saying "you" Yuta san explain very well the uses and that you must avoid at all cost using these.

    I've been living in japan for 10 months and nobody has said to me "you" in japanese, japanese always my name (or try to). Except for my wife when joking says omae!

    In case someone forget your name they will avoid the name and "you". I've learned to do this.

    Reply
  10. Suzanne

    Hello again Yuta san, thanks again for this lesson:)
    Now…..what I hear…..anata, anta, omae, jibun and kimi…..actually I watch a lot of Japanese dramas and these words are used pretty much! Maybe it's the same as in anime!!!!

    Reply
  11. Joseph

    This is my first lesson I am watching from you. This is something I sorta already knew but your break down and explaining it was done very well. Looking forward to more lessons.

    Reply
  12. Rohjan

    Thank you for the lesson Yuta san 😀 The way you teach is so clear and detailed. I look forward for your next lesson ^-^
    P.S: I really like your accent when speaking english 😀

    Reply
  13. Sofia

    Anata, anta, omae, temee, kisama

    Those are the only "you"s I knew.
    Thank you very much for the material, Yuta-san
    Greetings from Argentina

    Reply
  14. lutfi

    you mentioned that people don't talk like they do in anime or manga,so how much depiction of japanese in manga and anime is correct

    Reply
    1. August

      Not Yuta, but it largely depends on the anime. If you're watching something aimed at adults, you have a more realistic depiction, but even then they might add a lot of uncommon characteristics to spice up the characters. Most of the time you should be alright with learning some vocab from anime, but always check things over. You don't want to start sounding like a 10-year-old girl or a gangster.

      Reply
    2. yuta Post author

      If the anime takes place in realistic settings (today's Japan for example) characters' language is more likely to be closer to how people actually speak. But generally speaking, people in anime and drama tend to speak like fictional characters.

      Reply
      1. Nylocke

        How about Kochikame then? That kinda takes place in a semi realistic setting even though everyone doesn't do much actual police work xD

        I guess it would be like in the simpsons or something as far as exaggeration goes. Although its hard to say, I don't currently know anyone trying to learn english so I can't really say. I do know in tv shows most people are kinda exaggerated like in big bang theory or something.

        Anyway I watch a lot of anime so I pretty well know all the different ways to say "you" in japanese because I've been an anime fan for over 10 years now xD But another question I have on that note is that I hear some japanese females are more blunt with their speech these days(like some use boku to refer to themselves and use kimi to look down at guys or something). You ever hear of a real female using omae??? xD Even in anime the only time I heard a chick really USE omae was Shana from Shakugan no Shana

        Reply
  15. Anonymous

    all i can remember is anata,jibun,kimi,omae,jibun,temee,otaku(i once thought this words mean a person who watches anime),anta

    Reply
  16. JA

    well i know, anata, omae, kimi, kisama, and anta.. it is all i know, i think..
    i like your lesson i hope you can make it in spanish too, but exellent lesson thanks ありがとうございます : )

    Reply
  17. Sierra

    Otaku is a way of saying "you" ?
    I thought it was just to describe someone who really likes something like anime….

    Reply
    1. Charidan

      I would be careful with that word. "Otaku" (when not used to mean you) has a lot more implications on it than just liking anime. It's stereotype/trope that's kind of like "nerd" but with none of the redeeming qualities. In the full stereotype (from what I've picked up) an otaku is a fat, sweaty guy who is TOO into anime and plays too many dating sims, is excessively attached to one or more waifus (virtual girlfriends) and is socially incompetent.

      I'm sure not everyone means the full brunt of that every time they use the word, but beware that this meaning exists. If you play Danganronpa, all the characters there are basically the ideal realizations of stereotypes, and one of them is an otaku, and he's intentionally despicable.

      Reply
  18. Darrell Hall

    I really enjoy your videos here and on YouTube. I've just started learning Japanese, and find your videos very helpful. Thank you very much for doing this.

    Reply
  19. Andy

    Hello Yuta, what if I wanted to say "There is something behind you?" Would it be anata no ushiro wa nanika ga arimasu? Would Anata then be appropriate then?

    Reply
    1. Meshraz

      You could just omit the "you" used in the sentence:
      Ushiro ni nanika ga arimasu.

      When speaking, people will generally understand if you are referring to them or yourself.

      Reply
    1. Anonymous

      usually goes in 2 steps
      1: お名前は? Then you get their last name most likely
      2: ~さんは、先生ですか

      since you only go to these questions after talking to them for at least a little while

      Reply
  20. Jakayla

    The "formal" way of saying you is anata, which was the only way to say you that I knew.
    I'm glad that I learned that it's actually pretty rude before I went around saying it.
    rude/informal ways of saying you is kimi, omae, anta.
    Other ways of saying you are; jibun, onushi, temee, kisama, otaku.
    It's kind of strange to me that otaku means you because I've heard a lot of people say that otaku was a way of calling somebody a nerd.
    The desho and deshou is a little confusing but other than that I think I understand so far.
    Thanks Yuta!

    Reply
    1. Nylocke

      でしょ and でしょう basically express a level of certainty. Its almost like if you're making a statement that you're really sure about or something.

      Reply
  21. Chris

    I only knew about anata, kimi, omae, and kisama. This was very informative. I'm very glad to have watched this. I was only ever taught about anata, but I asked my teacher about omae. I remember him telling me that I probably shouldn't use omae. The other two I picked up from watching anime.

    Reply
  22. Tinya

    どもありがとう Yuta – San!

    But how can we then address someone whose name we don't know? For example if a man just drops his wallet and we want to point out. In English we can use "sir" or "madame" for women. Is there any equivalent that we can use?

    Reply
  23. Devin

    Suppose a person's name is max and i want to ask him " are you ok ? " withought using any of these words (anata, kimi, omae, anta)

    Reply
    1. UraKn0x

      In fact, 自分 can almost be translated to any singular "-self" word, as in "myself", "yourself", "oneself", "him/herself".

      Reply
  24. Bas

    Hi Yuta!
    Thanks a lot for the video! I am not that good at Japanese I think, but I'll give it a shot.
    Kimi, omae, jibun, teme, anata and that's about it I think. Also, I was wondering if you or anyone else here has a link to a place where you can practice the Japanese writing system, as I can only recognise a few characters in katakana but would like to get better.
    Again, thank you very much!

    P.S. Think I accidentally reacted to another comment instead of to the video

    Reply
  25. Jakayla

    After thinking, I have questions.
    How would I say "with you" without using (anta, kimi, etc) like if I wanted to take a picture with somebody and I was asking them "Is it ok if I take a picture with you?" and also, How would I say do you like without using (anta, kimi etc.) or is it kind of like Gakusei, where they understand that you're asking them a question? or would you just say the Japanese word for interests?

    Reply
    1. anonymous_noob

      "With you" can be expressed with the phrase "issho ni", which means "together". Let's go with your example. You'd say:

      Watashi to issho ni shashin o torimasu ka?
      (Literally: With me together picture take?)
      (Of course the more natural translation is: Do you want to take a picture with me?)
      [shashin = picture/photo; torimasu = -masu form of the verb 'toru' which means "to take"]

      If you notice in my original sentence though I didn't actually use any variation of 'you' at all. That's because if I'm speaking to someone 'you' is implied so there's no need to be direct and use any kind of word to express 'you'.

      That's a very important point to keep in mind when studying Japanese. It's HIGHLY CONTEXTUAL. The speaker IMPLIES and the listener INFERS. So when communicating, the more vague you are the more polite you are, and vice versa.

      For your last question, how to say "Do you like…", let's cover all our bases, shall we? Let's go over different variations of this that a beginner student would encounter and look at ways it'd be actually used in the real world versus textbook examples. Imagine I'm talking to you and about you. I want to ask "Do you like pizza". Some variations include:

      1. Anata wa PIZZA ga ski desu ka?
      2. Jakayla-san wa PIZZA ga ski desu ka?
      3. PIZZA (ga) ski desu ka?
      4. PIZZA ski (ka)?

      Time to dissect:

      1. Even if I didn't know your name in this situation, 'anata' (or any other 'you') is still pretty rude. I'm talking to you, right? Why do I have to say 'you' in the sentence? If I'm talking about someone else, of course I'd have to be specific and use that person's name. I can't just imply a person I'm thinking about and expect you to follow. You're not a mind reader.
      VERDICT: This is a classic textbook example for new learners but it should NOT BE USED.

      2. If I still wanted to be more specific, an alternate option to actually using a word for 'you' would be to just use the person's name directly. Earlier I said that being more vague is considered more polite. Another thing to keep in mind is the less you include in a sentence (of course, only if it's already understood), the more NATURAL you sound. So even if I didn't use 'you' and just used your name, again, I'm talking to you, right? So using your name, though more polite, is still rather redundant.
      VERDICT: This is a standard sentence when 2 people are starting to get to know each other. Forget #1. Start here.

      3. Expanding on that point of leaving out what's not necessary, I'm no longer addressing you other than the fact that I'm talking directly to you. I put 'ga' in ( ) to show that this particle can be left out as well.
      VERDICT: 'Desu' is still used so it's still polite and it's starting to sound more natural and colloquial.

      4. Going a step further the particles 'ga' and 'desu' are gone and the same can be done with 'ka'. But if you leave out the question-marking particle you'll have to show it's a question by a rising intonation at the end of the sentence.
      VERDICT: Definitely more colliquel but also more familiar. So this shouldn't really be used from the get-go but rather when 2 people are on friendly terms and it's been established that there's no need to be so formal and use keigo and stuff.

      Reply
    2. anonymous_noob

      "With you" can be expressed with the phrase "issho ni", which means "together". Let's go with your example. You'd say:

      Watashi to issho ni shashin o torimasu ka?
      (Literally: With me together picture take?)
      (Of course the more natural translation is: Do you want to take a picture with me?)
      [shashin = picture/photo; torimasu = -masu form of the verb 'toru' which means "to take"]

      If you notice in my original sentence though I didn't actually use any variation of 'you' at all. That's because if I'm speaking to someone 'you' is implied so there's no need to be direct and use any kind of word to express 'you'.

      That's a very important point to keep in mind when studying Japanese. It's HIGHLY CONTEXTUAL. The speaker IMPLIES and the listener INFERS. So when communicating, the more vague you are the more polite you are, and vice versa.

      For your last question, how to say "Do you like…", let's cover all our bases, shall we? Let's go over different variations of this that a beginner student would encounter and look at ways it'd be actually used in the real world versus textbook examples. Imagine I'm talking to you and about you. I want to ask "Do you like pizza". Some variations include:

      1. Anata wa PIZZA ga ski desu ka?
      2. Jakayla-san wa PIZZA ga ski desu ka?
      3. PIZZA (ga) ski desu ka?
      4. PIZZA ski (ka)?

      Time to dissect:

      1. Even if I didn't know your name in this situation, 'anata' (or any other 'you') is still pretty rude. I'm talking to you, right? Why do I have to say 'you' in the sentence? If I'm talking about someone else, of course I'd have to be specific and use that person's name. I can't just imply a person I'm thinking about and expect you to follow. You're not a mind reader. VERDICT: This is a classic textbook example for new learners but it should NOT BE USED.
      2. If I still wanted to be more specific, an alternate option to actually using a word for 'you' would be to just use the person's name directly as ways to establish you as the subject. Earlier I said that being more vague is considered more polite. Another thing to keep in mind is the less you include in a sentence (of course, only if it's already understood), the more NATURAL you sound. So even if I didn't use 'you' and just used your name, again, I'm talking to you, right? So using your name, though more polite, is still rather redundant. VERDICT: This is a standard sentence when 2 people are starting to get to know each other. Forget #1. Start here.
      3. Expanding on that point of leaving out what's not necessary, I'm no longer addressing you other than the fact that I'm talking directly to you. I put 'ga' in () to show that this particle can be left out as well. VERDICT: 'Desu' is still used so it's still polite and it's starting to sound more natural and colliquel.
      4. Going a step further the particles 'ga' and 'desu' are gone and the same can be done with 'ka'. But if you leave out the question-marking particle you'll have to show it's a question by a rising intonation at the end of the sentence. VERDICT: Definitely more colliquel but also more familiar. So this shouldn't really be used from the get-go but rather when 2 people are on friendly terms and it's been established that there's no need to be so formal and use keigo and stuff.

      Reply
  26. Dominic

    Hello Yuta. Thank you very much for another great lesson.
    Its very helpful and Im very excited for the next one.

    Have a great time and thank you again 😀

    Reply
  27. That Guy over there

    Hi Yuta, nice Lesson, now I understand Japanese people doesn't really use the word "You". I watch anime and I often hear these words from the characters:

    Anta

    Kimi

    Anata

    Kisama (when a character is mad or something of sort)

    Temee

    and Omae… these are the only words I know that means "You" in english until I watched you're lesson.. Thank you for the Awesome lesson

    Reply
  28. Paul

    Well. I`m a bit outdated, but…
    I have already known such pronouns like "anata", "kimi", "omae", "temee"(I`ve saw "temae" somewhere, but I`m not sure if it`s correct). And I`ve seen "Jibun" and "otaku" but not as pronouns (Well, "Jibun" as pronoun but for "I")

    Reply
  29. Jannis

    I assume that Japanesse people use names instead of "you". Correct me if I'm wrong.
    About the word "anata" i thougt it meant "dear" used by couples or is something completely different?
    And "otaku" what about this word, doesn't mean "someone who is "addicted" to something"?

    Reply
  30. Kylie

    I've not seen onushi お主 before… and I've seen otaku おたく before but not as meaning the word 'you'.

    Everything else I have seen and I typically try to skip 'you' when saying something in Japanese.

    Reply
  31. Emre

    Allays words I know ti say "you" in japanese are in the video. In the video there are some I didn't know until today.

    Reply
  32. Lea

    Japanese 'You':
    Anata, anta, kimi, omae, temee, otaku, jibun, kisama.
    That's all I can remember now. But aren't 'temee' and 'kisama' an insult? I can recall them being used as insult.

    Reply
  33. María

    I observed that in some japanese tv programs sometimes when they say "omae, baka da na" or similar, is not like an insult but more like a form to call the atencion with the meaning of "You shouldn't say those things" or "If you continue, I will get angry". It is correct, doesn't it?

    Reply
    1. yuta Post author

      Yes, that's correct. I remember there's a song by Ken Hirai that says something like 'baka da na' in an affectionate way.

      Reply
      1. nyditch

        I'm sure I've heard tsundere characters in anime use something like 'baka da na" in that way.

        I could see myself using 'anata' if I was at a loss for an alternative with my limited Japanese knowledge, but I would feel like I'm being mean if I use any of the others. Maybe 'anta' or 'omae' if yelling at someone who just did something bad. 'Temee' and 'kisama' just seem like ways to pick a fight.

        Reply
  34. Yuwono

    The yous I'm already familiar with are:
    Kimi, Omae, Anata, Kisama, and Temee.

    As a note, I've heard of the word "Jibun" from a famous doujin circle in Japan and I never thought I would see the word "Otaku" as a you. And I also wanted to ask something, if you don't mind:
    I heard that "Touhou" is also means "Me", but am I right to assume that this word is still contextually(?) connected with "Touhou" as "Eastern"?

    Again, thanks a lot for the lesson

    Reply
  35. Phillip Pether

    If saying <i>"you"</i> in Japanese is considered rude and impolite, then how do you ask someone a basic question with the word <i>"you"</i> in it?

    For example, if you to ask someone what they're doing on the weekend with <i>"Are you busy this weekend?"</i>

    or for another example to ask if someone who might need help with <i>"Do you need some help?"</i>

    what is the way of asking these in Japanese without it sounding like its rude or impolite?

    Reply
    1. Nina

      As much as I do, you just don't.

      Are you busy this weekend? – Busy this weekend?
      Do you need help? – Need help?

      I know it sounds really weird 😀

      Reply
    2. yuta Post author

      You think you need 'you' because you are thinking in English. If you get more familiar with Japanese and start thinking in Japanese, you don't even think about using 'you'.

      Reply
  36. Janina

    Hey Yuta, I have a question..
    What should I use if I talk to someone and want to say something about them?
    Like if I said "かしこいね", how would another person know if I meant myself or them? And if I'm standing in a group but want to talk to one person (without weirdly looking at them) ?

    It's really weird for me not to say you because I do it all the time 😀 In German it's a necessary part of the sentence to mark the object or subject so we can never really not say it 🙂

    (I think I already accidently postet this somewhere but I can neither find nor delete it.. sorry!)

    Reply
    1. yuta Post author

      When you use 'ne' it's most likely about the other person. 'Ne' is often used when you make a remark about the other person. You can also use her name. 'Janina, kashikoi ne.'

      Reply
  37. Seth

    I've actually used temee before, but as a joke when I spoke to one of my friends who speaks Japanese.

    The only you I didn't know was anta.

    Reply
  38. GlorIa

    I'm familiar with anata, temee, omae, kisama, kimi, onore, jibun, and otaku because of drama and anime, although I've heard jibun more in music, likely due to its versatility.

    Great lesson, Yuta.

    Reply
  39. Brian

    All the "you"s I knew were in the video already… What I find great is that every lesson or definition of あんた I've seen always has a direct or subtle reference to Asuka.

    Reply
  40. Amber

    I've heard all of them before in anime and in manga as 'you' except for 'otaku'. Why is that considered as 'you'?

    Reply
  41. Vanesa

    The 'you' words I've heard before this lesson are anata, kimi, and omae. Anata I heard in a song (Anata No Naka No Wasureta Umi by People in the Box) while kimi and omae I've seen in manga.

    I was recently watching a youtube video of a girl who lives in Japan listing the many "swear" words Japanese people use. 'Temee' was one of them. It's really interesting to see how Japanese find these words rude and insulting.

    Thank you for the lesson! I'm looking forward for more! 🙂

    Reply
  42. harish

    hey yuta san how are you ??
    thanks alot for your help .
    today i want to know that what we use with family arimasu or imasu.

    Reply
  43. khadidja

    i learned new words that i really should take care to not use them , thank you
    but what about asking or montioning possissive thing , is it formal to say for exemple :
    sore ha anata no kuruma desu ka
    anata no otanjoubi ha itsu desu ka

    Reply
  44. Andre

    お前 あなた あんた
    貴様 てめえ きみ
    おぬし おのれ
    I here those a lot in Anime and Manga, but in real life i know 貴様 , おぬし and おのれ are dead words, but sometimes i hear 貴様 used by soldiers in old WW2 movies.

    Reply
  45. M

    Good lesson thank you
    I have a question , you wrote "jibun" as a "you" but from what I know and usually listen that jibun means "myself" ?

    can I receive both of intermediate and advanced lessons please ?
    Thank you.

    Reply
  46. Paige

    I'm sure I have heard many more from watching anime but the only one I can really remember is Anata. Great video, thanks Yuta 🙂

    Reply
  47. Will

    あなた、お前、君、あんた I hear all the time in anime. There's also the odd おぬし (when the character speaks like an old person, usually using わし for "I"), 貴様 and おのれ (those are more widely used as an angry interjection though), and I remember hearing 僕 being used when referring to young boys. I should have heard a lot more but can only remember those right now. Never actually heard 自分 being used in that sense though, I think.

    Reply
  48. Michelle

    My mom uses "jibun" a lot. She would say, "Jibun dake kangaeru kara…" or something like that. saying I would only think about myself.

    Reply
  49. S と B

    Thank you very much for the lesson. It was very informative.

    I actually heard/read anatagata (plural) (I think from a girl), anata (guy, girl), anta (girl), kimi (guy), omae (guy), temee (guy), kisama (guy), onushi (guy) and otaku . I can't quite remember from whom I heard the last one. Maybe also from a guy. And I do remember all those 'you's from Manga, Anime and games. Wow, japanese entertainment really is colorful! O.o

    I do have a question though: Isn't 'anata' also used by wives to say 'dear' to their husbands?

    Kind regards
    S と B

    Reply
  50. Anonymous

    i always thought kimi was reasonably polite, thanks to the anime experience :'( maybe because of "kimi ni todoke"

    anata, kimi, omae, otaku, temee, kisama, onushi, anta…
    i feel like i've heard more but they're things that wouldn't really count
    like "kono-…" or "yarou" in fights,
    or bouya

    Reply
  51. Anonymous

    In my textbook it has a conversation like this:

    Person A: Onamae wa nan desu ka?
    Person B: Sumisu desu. Anata wa?
    Person A: Suzuki desu.

    Something like that. So is "Anata wa?" ("And you?") inappropriate in this case or is it okay? If it's not okay, what should this conversation actually look like?

    Reply
  52. Anonymous

    I guess this another example of how anime Japanese differs from real Japanese? I hear all the variations of "you" constantly in the shows that I watch. Some used in a rude context, some not. I learned most of the words for "you" just by watching anime, before even deciding I'd try to learn a language.

    Reply
  53. zaynah-

    the ones I know are anata, omae, kisama, temee, kimi, and anta :3 oh and jibun but I'm pretty sure you can't be like "jibun wa" lol more like…"jibun no sei desu"…or am I making things up? xD

    thank you for the informative video! I didn't realise that these versions of "you" were more an anime thing than real life.

    Reply
  54. Pauline Graillet

    I will give the feeling I had when I hear the word in the context but as a watcher of animes and reader of manga (as you said, Japanese people don't speak like that in real life).
    List of japanese "you" I know :
    Anata : common word that almost used in all anime (and I thought that was the official "you" in polite Japanese… oh well, I will try to not use it …).
    Omae : I thought it used by girls and boys in the context of friendship and familiar but in the same time, it keeps a bit of politeness (but you said it's more man's word like "ore").
    Anta : I hear it like you described it, as a sense of tense and of conflit (whether is for joking or for provoking others).
    Kimi : I thought it was used for polite people who are older than yourself but as you said it's more like a superior position (status maybe).
    Kisama : I hear it like it's almost an insult used by someone upset but also who has a important status (reputation or family honor) or someone who wants to feel superior compared to the person she speaks to.
    Temee : it's like "kisama" but used by punks or other kids from the streets.
    I didn't know about "jibun" as I thought it's used for our ownself (oftenly translated by "yourself", "herself", "himself", "myself"). As for "otaku", it"s more the signification of someone who has a passion (for the common passion of mangas and animes).
    I don't have any ideas for "onushi", I"m unawared of this "you" but I would say (just by impression) it's used for the most formal people like the royal family members and the relatives or by people from other era (like Edo period).
    If the feeling I described for those "you" you didn't talk about is not the right feeling, please let me know the real context they can be use (I would finally understand … well I hope ^^).

    Reply
  55. Leila

    I recently subscribed to these lessons and they are interesting BUT I have to say I'm a bit surprised regarding the level of the lessons. I sign up as "upper intermediate" since I'm a graduate student who majored in Japanese studies (but with an awful japanese, fufufu), but so far all the topics that has been brought up has been too easy for me. Is this really concidered upper intermediate or am I getting other videos by mail aswell?
    Also, I would like to hear more when you explain grammar. Like in this video you say that we should not use anata to strangers. What I would like to know then is; why (what tone does anata give in Japanese) and what should be used instead (to a stranger).

    Otherwise I really enjoy your youtube channel, especially the videos in which you interview Japanese people! =) (I use them as Japanese practice, trying to listen as much as I can to how people speak)

    Reply
  56. Zsuzsa

    I find it quite interesting, that the japanese language used in manga/anime differs from the normal spoken japanese. Why is that? It is an interesting fact, and your videos are the first, where I hear this. Many of my japanese language teachers (they were not from japanese origin) advised me to watch anime in order to learn the language. Maybe it is not the best idea, because it can mislead you, and you end up beeing rude, or weird whyle talking.

    Reply
  57. Darshana

    anata
    anta
    kisama
    theme
    omaye
    kimiwa

    I can't remember anymore. I heard all of these in anime. 🙂

    Reply
  58. Henrique

    So I was wondering, to say "I", for example, 私 or 僕 can be used, and to say "my", 私の and 僕の can be used, isn't it? Like…
    "This is my book."
    これは僕の本です。

    But what about "your"? Suppose I see something on the ground, probably dropped by someone, and a person is standing right next to that thing… I would pick it up and ask to that person: "Is this yours?" But how could I say that in Japanese, not being rude?

    By the way, the only "you"s I know are those in the lesson, except for そなた that I heard in Spirited Away. Haku said that all the time with Chihiro.

    Reply
  59. Lars Fröberg

    Hi Yuta-san!
    Thank you for another great lesson.
    I was wondering if the use of the word anata is accepted to be used as your/yours by saying Sore ha anata no inu desu ka? for example or is there another more polite way to say it to a stranger or to a friend? I know that if there is someone that you know that you are polite to you use their name or title instead. I have been using anata no without getting a mad face many times, could be because I am a foreigner though.
    Take good care and looking forward to your next lesson..

    Reply
  60. Aditya

    As usual, I don't know the kanji, but here are the second person pronouns I've come across:

    あなた
    あんた
    きみ
    おまえ
    おのれ
    てめえ (also rarely てまえ)
    きさま (I never understood why this is rude, because of the さま)
    きか
    きかん
    おんしゃ (also きしゃ)
    おたく (rare)
    おぬし (rare)
    なんじ (super rare)
    そなた (I think I saw this in anime)

    Reply
  61. Yuan

    I always thought 自分 meant 'myself'. Surprised to know it was actually another way of saying 'you'

    Reply
  62. Anonymous

    Thank you for the lesson! I came across omae and kimi first in songs and anata in a textbook. Your last video and this one were extremely useful.

    Reply
  63. Jess MS

    I'm a few days late because internet problems, but~
    Jibun
    Kisama
    Anata
    Anta
    Omae
    Kimi
    Onore
    Temee

    Reply
  64. Peter

    I thought otaku was used to describe someone who was a fan or obsesses over a particular subject. For example a fan of a paricular anime or going for drive in the countryside and is a general description to describe otaku culture.

    Reply
  65. Alex

    What is the best way to say "How about you?" So far I have been saying:
    [Name]は?
    However, often I won't know their name (and don't wish to ask), or saying the above over and over sounds a bit repetitive. Is there a better or alternate ways to say "How about you?" or "What about you?" In Japanese?

    Thanks for reading.

    Reply
  66. Yaviwa

    Yuta-san, thank you once again! This helped me a lot, but I just didn't get something very clear: So in japanese, we avoid as much as we can to say "you". But if we actually have to, and we say "anata" will japanese people find it weird? Also, I heard that "anata" can mean something close to "darling" sometimes, is that correct, and would that be the reason why it sound weird to say it?

    Reply
  67. Kailani

    I thought temee was a way to be insulting because in most animes I hear temee but the subtitles say 'bitch.' Sorry I felt that was inappropriate to use on here and asking about it, but I was just curious if there a different degrees for levels of rudness associated with the word 'you' depending on which one you use.

    Reply
    1. Sean Emrick

      I think it is a way to be insulting. As Yuta mentioned they are quite rude. You will often see omae, temee, and kisama translated to expletives in English subtitles, because in English we don't really have a way of conveying that "you" can be used in a very direct insulting way in Japanese. At least that's my take on it anyway.

      Reply
  68. サムエル

    あなた, きみ, おまえ, あんた, てめえ, きさま, おのれ are the only ones I've heard before.

    Reply
  69. Nate

    Anata, Kimi, Omae, and Anta. Even though I watch anime and read manga, I have heard a few of these, but can never remember them. I actually found it hilarious of seeing anta and pausing the video to tell my friend of Asuka's famous "Anta Baka" phrase, only for you to immediately bring it up.

    Reply
  70. Donovan Matson

    Do you have a video about pitch accent at all. I hear it's supposed to be a thing, like the words for candy and rain depending on the pitch at certain parts can change its meaning but in hiragana they are both spelled as あめ。

    Reply
  71. Jimmy

    Well, I knew about anata, kimi, temee, omae, kisama, temee and jibun only. Hard to forget male anime characters's war cry.

    Reply
  72. Hana

    I've only heard あなた and 君. I listen to a lot of Vocaloid songs, so I often go along with what I hear in the songs.

    Reply
  73. Baudry

    Anata
    Anta
    Omae
    Kimi
    Temee
    Jibun etc…

    I already heard about every you in this video except Otaku and Onushi.
    For me otaku refers to people obsessed in a hobby, i didn't know it could be used to say you !

    Reply
  74. Kazu

    I really only know Anata from text books. I find it interesting that in a lot of textbooks and programs Anata is one of the first words taught but it isn't used.

    Reply
  75. mensa

    Easily understood however many people, like in the USA must learn to think like Japanese as it would be easy to slip and thus be viewed as rude

    Reply
  76. Jastin

    i only knew "anata", "kimi" , and. "omae" before watching this, but i heard jibun, anta and some others thru anime or J-songs

    Reply
  77. Elan

    Have you made a video on the hiragana alphabet? I have absolutely no clue what's been going on for the past few lessons. I see desu and masu all the time but i don't know what it means. I'm 100% lost 😛

    Reply
  78. Danielle Sonnenberg

    Anata
    Anta
    Otaku
    Kimi

    These are the only words for "you" that I know. But I am finally understanding things. Thank you so much!

    Reply
  79. タジ

    I knew of

    あなた
    きみ
    おまえ
    自分
    あんた
    きさま
    てめえ
    Even in anime あんた is rarely used from what i remember.

    I didn't know きみ was informal though that's interesting.

    きさま  and てめえ i think are very rude ways to say "you" i generally hear it when two characters are fighting or speaking ill of each other.

    ありがとうございます ゆたー先生

    I don't know how to say "thanks for the lesson" yet 🙂

    Reply
  80. Clément

    I knew of あなた、お前。Only two haha ^^
    I also knew 自分 as "myself" and 貴様 but I thought it was an insult ^^. I didn't know it means "you".

    Thanks for your lessons Yuta, I learn a lot from watching your videos !

    Reply
  81. Benjamin

    I was only aware of あなた being a romantic form of 'you', akin to "darling"
    Others I knew were お前,君,貴様,てめえ and of course あんた, for the exact reason you suspected.

    Reply
  82. Sean Emrick

    I knew of anata, omae, kimi, anta, temee, and kiisama. I didn't know about otaku, onushi or jibun.

    Reply
  83. Maika

    Hi Yuta! I have a question. Jibun was also listed in the "saying I" video under "other ways of saying I". Does "jibun" mean I, you or both?
    I'm pointing it out because I do not know if it was intentional or not!

    Reply
  84. Anonymous

    Is kisama and temee considered a 'you'? Because in anime's they would say 'kisama' or 'temee' and the subtitles would write 'you bastard'.

    Reply
  85. Andrew

    Anta
    Anata
    Omae
    Kimi
    Kisama
    Temee
    Otaku
    Jibun
    Thank you for letting me know that 'anta' is something older women say, i'm going to stop using that one now and just stick to using names.

    Reply
  86. Steve

    Anta, anata, omae, kimi, otaku are all ways of saying you that I knew previous to this video I now know kisama, temee, and jibun. Thanks again Yuta-san more knowledge the better.

    Reply
  87. Heidy

    Anata, Kimi, omae, anta, kisama. These are you's I know for now. Because sometimes when I watch anime I don't know what is the 'you' in their dialogue. Especially when they speak a whole sentence which I can't understand every single word. I'll just look at the subtitles.haha. Thank you for giving other words of 'you'.

    Reply
  88. Anonymous

    Jibun is kind of a weird one, jibun wa dou omou? Translates to what do you yourself think, and depending on context could mean myself. When is jibun used to point to myself ?

    Reply
  89. Caelan De Jager

    So do you just compleatly drop you/あなた all togeather. So you would just say せんせいですか instead of あなたはせんせいですか??

    Reply
  90. Pekka

    I've heard all of those that you listed except "otaku", I've never heard that being used as a "you".
    That Asuka example was a surprise, didn't see that one coming.

    Fun fact: in my country (Finland), "Kimi" is a common man's name and it's pronounced the exact same way in Finnish language as in Japanese language.

    Keep up the great work Yuta! 🙂

    Reply
  91. CyborgPenguin

    In the Dragon Ball Super "kisama" is often used by Vegeta and is usually subbed as "bastard" in English.

    Reply
  92. Michael

    Wait, Otaku is considered a form of "you"? Forgive me for being an uniformed gaijin but I thought it meant a person who was obsessed with something?

    Reply
  93. Noah D.

    Thank you, that was pretty helpful.
    In the last weeks, I met a group of japanese medicine students here in Germany, which I could talk to. Talking to them, I usually used their name+kun oder Omae, if it was a funny situation between us guys like ''Omae wa honma baka ya na'', when we talked about Manzai comedy.
    Also, it's only 17 days until I fly to Japan myself. Till then, I'll try to learn as much words as possible, because the vocabulary still is my biggest weakpoint.

    Reply
  94. Dana

    I only know anata from textbooks. I think almost every chapter transliterated "you" in the sentence. I've heard kimi and omae from anime.

    Reply
  95. Allison

    I remember hearing "omae" in an anime I was watching recently, granted I forgot the name of said anime but meh. Though I've heard/seen "anata" used often and kimi" a few times. I had no idea "otaku" meant you though. I've only ever heard it used to describe people who were obsessed with anime and the like. Though it wasn't in a very positive light.

    Reply
  96. James

    Anata
    Kimi
    Temee
    Omae
    Kisama
    Jibun

    Of these list I know, the top three is the ones I a bit more familiar with. Temee was something I just recently learned just a couple months back and realized how it was used, haha.

    Reply
  97. Stepherlee

    I get what you're saying but from what you explained it seems like as a beginner if you're going use a sentence with "you" in it, you don't have a choice but to use anata because the other forms you mentioned aren't appropriate.

    Reply
  98. Theresa

    In anime like bleach they use temee and kisama as insults. They often use it towards villians. In One Piece Boa Hancock were shocked when Luffy addressed her with omae and everyone was shocked. So some things can be taught by anime too. In songs they often use kimi and boku too.
    In Detective Conan they one talked about Tokyo and Osaka slang that they switch the meanings between jibun and boku I think…

    Reply
  99. Theresa

    Otaku is used by western people as a description for a anime , manga and Japan lover. I heard that this is in Japan an insult for manga and anime addicted people.

    Reply
  100. Nero

    Great lesson first of all! Thanks for publishing!

    Though I'm kinda confused about 貴様, so it would be nice, if someone could help!

    Etimologically it actually seems like a very polite way of addressing people, given the components' meanings, but – as already established – it sounds very rude, when used.

    Why is that? Due to it being commonly perceived as sarcasm maybe?
    If that's it, would it be possible or even plausible to encounter it being used sincerely and by extension politely too?

    Reply
  101. Ian

    I don't have much vocabulary knowledge right now, but I had seen "anata" before.

    I have definitely heard "omae", "temee", and "kisama" in animes, but as other poeple pointed out they are used almost as swear words, and I remember seeing them translated as "jerk" or "bastard" or something similar.

    Thank you to Yuta and also to all the other folks who replied here – tons of useful info in these comments.

    Reply
  102. Emma

    anata (Anata is from my jap class. We use it when saying things like 'anata wa' meaning 'and you?'….. I think)
    anta
    kisama
    teme
    omaye
    kimiwa
    Rest of these i heard in anime

    Reply
  103. Joey

    うぬ
    おまえ
    あんた
    あなた
    きさま
    てめえ
    きみ
    おのれ
    Did not bother to find the right kanji but these are the ones I've heard from anime.

    Reply
    1. Andrew

      As far as I understand people will typically refer to the person by their name with an honorific or just state them by their role as a person or status within that scenario. I could be wrong.

      Reply
  104. 權畑昌明

    ・名前を使う・
    君(きみ)
    貴方・貴女・貴男(あなた~あんた)
    御前(おまえ~おめぇ)
    貴様(きさま)
    自分(じぶん)
    手前(てまえ~てめぇ)
    己(おのれ)
    そちら

    古語とか方言とかで:
    爾(な~なれ)
    汝(なむち~なんじ)
    御前(ごぜん)
    我(わ~われ)
    俺(おれ)
    それ
    そこ

    Reply
    1. Rukomura

      Keigo, because there is "desu" and "ka".
      for reference, non-keigo can be:
      (あなたの)名前は何(or なん)だ?
      (Anata no) namae wa nan'da?

      (Correct me if I'm any wrong plz)

      Reply
    2. Anonymous

      Well it is keigo but still its rude since you use "you" remember what the sensei said never use you with strangers, you can instead say: onamae wa? If you are talking with a same age friendish person Or in a more respectful way for example towards elder people you can use Onamae wo itadakemasen/oshiemasen/kikasemasen ka? Still i believe the best way would be telling your name and expecting them to return the favor right after or going into a sentence where you are about to refer to them and make a stop so they would realize and tell their name

      Reply
  105. Logan McCarthy

    Anata
    Kimi
    Omai
    Anta
    Jibun
    Onushi
    Temee
    Kisama
    Otaku

    I had heard anata, omai, temee, and kisama before. Thank you for the additional words, Yuta! 🙂 This was a good lesson!

    Reply
  106. 052005

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    30412

    Reply
  107. Archy

    Aren't あなた and おまえ also used as "terms of endearment" by husbands and wives? The lesson does not mention this form. Do I misunderstand, or was it just overlooked?

    Reply
  108. JaiyaPapaya

    I have a question. In my current Japanese course, I learned how to ask a persons name. It was
    "あなたのなまえはなんですか?"
    So if あなた is rude, how would I ask?

    Reply
    1. Archy

      From my sensei, I understand that the person being asked would be implied, thus you would ask with an honorific お。。。

      おなまえはなんですか。

      and the person being asked would respond with their name.

      Reply
  109. Juan Strauss

    formal (Use for strangers or wife): 'Anata'
    Informal(Use for someone we know like friends,siblings but not parents) : 'Kimi, Omae, Anta'
    Rude: 'Temee, kisama'.
    Words I know but don't know how to use: 'Jibun'
    Words I don't know: 'Onushi'

    I don't think Otaku means 'you', because that shows someone obsessing to something, especially Anime.
    Rather than using informal words to someone we know, I think it's better to call their name with '-san' at the end of it.

    Reply
  110. Gianfranco

    Formal:
    – Anata
    Informal:
    – Kimi
    – Omae
    – Anta
    Rude:
    -Temee
    -Kisama
    -Otaku
    I've never heard "Onushi" or "Jibun".

    Reply
  111. Dave

    How do you address someone if you really do not know their name, or their position? Like, if you just have a brief interaction with another person on the subway train and you, for whatever reason, need to ask them a question about themselves?

    Reply
    1. Kalen

      These are the only ones I knew before you taught me the other ways to say you: Jibun, Anata, Temee, Omae, Kimi, Kisama.

      Reply
  112. Yen

    Hello Yuta-san,
    Thank you for a very informative video.
    Here's my list of "you"s in Japanese.

    Anata あなた
    Kimi 君
    Omae お前
    Anta あんた
    Kisawa 貴様
    Temee てめえ
    Onore 己
    Onushi お主
    Otaku お宅

    Best regards,
    Yen

    Reply
  113. Kaleo Namauu

    あなた- 貴方- Anata
    おまえ- お前- Omae
    じぶん- 自分- Jibun
    きみ- 君- Kimi
    おのれ- 己- Onore
    おたく- お宅- Otaku
    おぬし- お主- Onushi
    きさま- 貴様- Kisama
    あんた- あんた- Anta
    てめえ- てめえ- Temee

    これは全部ですか?

    Reply
  114. Tam

    I only know あなた, 君, おまえ, てめえ and
    きさま.
    But I though "てめえ" was an insult and
    "おたく" was a person who really loves anime (?) before watching your lesson !

    Thank you !

    Reply
  115. Sarah

    I feel like Patrick Star trying to answer a math question. Since you should avoid using you, maybe I'll just stick to that lol. This lesson was really confusing.

    Reply
  116. anonymaster

    You said that でしょ is the non-keigo version of でしょう.
    What's the difference between でしょ and だろう then?

    Reply
  117. Christina

    Well i just knew あなた、君 and あんた. As well as I knew that あんた is a more or less rude way of saying you. But I thought it might be okay using あなた or 君 with friends or people of the same age because when I write with japanese people they sometimes you あなた or 君 as well. Maybe they just use it so I can understand it better then when quitting you … ?

    Reply
  118. Guy

    Interestingly, the question "Are you a man or a woman?" is so rude in English that the only time you could ever politely use it is on a survey or paperwork, but it would almost never be written that way. More likely it would be "What is your gender?" or simply "Gender" or "Sex", to which you would enter your own answer.

    Reply
  119. Joe C

    Oh Asuka, poor Asuka. Can't wait for 'Final' to come out.

    Seeing "omae" is interesting considering I've recently learned "na (名)" to mean 'name' (Kimi no Na wa, fantastic movie). I find this interesting since I first learned 'your name' as onamae (or as o-namae) as in 'onamae wa nan desu ka?'. I'm curious on the 前 part. お~ is a prefix attached to nouns to indicate the noun in question belongs to someone other than the speaker in a polite fashion and 名 is the root of the word that means 'name', so what is the deal with 前? and what's the deal with お前 meaning 'you'?

    Reply
  120. エリス

    I know
    貴方-あなた
    自分-じぶん
    君-きみ
    お前-おまえ
    お宅-おたく
    Thank you for the lesson sensei.
    なたね!

    Reply
  121. エリス

    I know
    貴方-あなた
    自分-じぶん
    君-きみ
    お前-おまえ
    お宅-おたく
    てめえ
    Thank you for the lesson sensei.
    なたね!

    Reply
  122. Anonymous

    But doesn't "Otaku" mean like nerd, shut in, obessive person? So isn't using "otaku" as "you" the most rude way to say "you"?

    Reply
    1. Joe

      From what I've heard, Otaku is a very archaic/old fashioned way of saying "you". At some point people in some nerdy/otaku communities started using it to refer to each other, so the word eventually became a synonym for that type of people.

      Reply
  123. Samuil

    あなた
    あんた

    お前
    てめえ
    貴様
    However, i didn't know about オタク、or 自分 being used as pronouns.
    んじゃ、じゅごうにありがとうございました、青木先生。

    Reply
  124. Lindsay Slocum

    If anata is too formal, and kimi/omae/anta can be taken as rude in many situations, should they be completely taken out of conversation altogether?

    Reply
  125. Shida

    Hello~ and yes I watched anime so I know all the you's that you mentioned just now. XD

    Anata
    Anta
    Kimi
    Omae
    Jibun
    Temee
    Onushi
    Kisama

    But wait! Otaku also refers to 'you'?

    Reply
  126. Rafael

    Hi,
    I only knew "anata" , "kimi" and "omae". This other ords like "temee" i've seen on anime but i thought it was a way of cursing someone.
    Cheers,

    Reply
  127. Riccardo

    This is the first time I hear "otaku" as "you", I'm surprised (I'm guessing they're written differently though). From anime I know
    anata
    anta
    omae
    kimi
    temee
    kisama
    jibun
    I was pretty sure "temee" and "kisama" were insults though…

    Reply
  128. Anonymous

    I have personally come across,
    1) Anata
    2) Omae
    3) Anta
    4) Kimi
    5) Jibun
    6) Teme and kisama which I always thought were insults.
    In what sort of situation could one use "otaku"?

    Reply
  129. Stefan Søndergaard Pedersen

    あなた
    きみ
    おまえ
    あんた
    じぶん
    きさま
    てめえ

    Isn't anata also used by loved ones? In a loving way. Like saying "dear".

    Reply
  130. Anonymous

    Well that clarifies the different ways of saying you. But i did hear 君 as "kun" in an anime. It was used at the end of a name. What's the difference between kun and san exactly?

    Reply
  131. Matheus

    Anta
    Anata
    Kimi
    Onushi
    Kisama
    Temee
    Omae

    One question, Yuta: In anime, I've seen some characters use the word "sonata" as if it meant "you", altought they are VERY rare. Is that correct though, sonata meaning you, or does it mean something else?

    Reply
    1. Koen

      Hmm no, not really but for me some words stuck with me after watching anime for so long and not just the easy ones. I also learned: 念のため。(nennotame, just to be sure).
      So while it may not help you actually practice actual speech it does help with pronounciation and listening.

      Reply
    2. Rusty

      I suspect anime isn't the best, but, finding yourself a good manga could be a good option. Thats what I did, bought a bunch, and it is working as a motivator to learn so I can read it. I'm sure you would learn a lot of words, structure, etc. but maybe not a great learning tool to have a conversation. I suspect you would learn all that after a few months in japan anyway, but good to have a solid foundation.

      Reply
  132. Danielle Oliveira

    Kisama
    Anata
    Anta
    Omae
    I hear this words watching anime… Great video, help me to undertand a little bit more
    Muito Obrigada!

    Reply
  133. Daniel Geoghan

    only reason i knew that omae was an informal and weirdly to me atleast quite aggressive way of saying you was because of Sa, omae wa tsumi o kazoero, which is double and skulls proclamation before fighting dopants in kamen rider W. you learn weird things when you watch way too much kamen rider and super sentai.

    Reply
  134. Tomer

    I am happy to learn that 'you' isn't used.
    All my "knowledge" is from anime/ manga, and I remember seeing those:
    Anata
    Anta
    Omae
    Kime
    Temee

    Question: Is it expected to use 'you' in formal form?

    Reply
  135. Anonymous

    Thank you so much for this video, Yuta. It's super helpful.
    I find it amazing how different English is from Japanese, and how there are so many ways to use different words in different sentences, depending on who you're speaking too.
    I can't wait to see the next insightful video.

    Reply
  136. Heather

    The different words for you are:
    anata (formal)
    kimi, omae, anta (in-formal)

    I have a question. In anime I hear the phrase "wa ga ta" but when I ask a friend who knows some Japanese he doesn't know what that phrase means. Could you explain what that means?

    Reply
  137. ton

    hello mr. yuta san, do (you) in japanese have plural or singular form?
    and can you make a video about the honorifics next time "_" or do you have in your previous lesson? thank you

    Reply
  138. ton

    hello mr. yuta san, do (you) in japanese have plural or singular form?
    do you have video lesson about honorifics before? can you make one if you don't ?
    thanks

    Reply
  139. Youssef Latouf

    Great video as always, as for all the uses of you I can remember in Japanese, well after watching this video I got
    Omae
    Anta
    Kimi
    Otaku
    Anata
    Jibun
    Onushi
    Temee
    Kisama

    I'm sure I have heard more from some anime or Japanese video games i have played that I probably missed, but I do remember hearing Otaku used to call people into anime and manga culture. I also remeber Anta as an insult from some anime, like Evangelion, and I remember hearing Jibun in some anime I have watched

    Reply
  140. Anonymous

    So, how would you so 'You too' in Japanese? As in 'merry christmas to you too' or 'do this too', would you just use their name or actually use anata, kimi etc. ?

    Reply
  141. Sara

    Anata
    Kimi
    Temee
    Anta
    Omae
    Onushi
    Kisama
    Otaku
    Jibun
    Onore
    Konata
    Socchi
    Onmi
    Nanji
    That's all I can think of right now

    Reply
  142. William

    great lesson, though I think I am in the wrong level. I'll wait for one-two more emails before deciding to change my level. I don't even know my own level as I never take JLPT, but it seems lower-intermediate level is too low for me.

    Just wondered about omae several days ago actually – and thank you for explaining. I used to think omae is polite (mind that I do not watch anime) due to "o". That goes with others such as ohashi, osushi, gochuui, goannai, etc.

    Reply
  143. B Ford

    These are the ones that I have heard. I didn't know about the おたく one. These videos are very helpful.
    あなた
    おまえ
    てぬえ
    きみ
    じべん
    あんた
    きさま

    Reply
  144. Joshua O.

    I personally only heard of the anata before.
    In Anime I do understand they mean you, but it feels suggested or insinuated as "you," so I casually accept it.

    Reply
  145. Nicole

    I hear "kimi" more in rock songs sung by female singers and I hear a lot of "omae" along with "ore" in rock songs sung by male singers. I also hear "ore/omae" spoken by some of the more aggressive or masculine male anime characters like Eren from Shingeki no Kyojin or Saitama from One Punch Man.

    "Jibun": In context so far (mostly songs), I have heard it referring to oneself, but not to someone else. I looked it up on jisho, and it looks like it can mean either (I/me, you, myself, yourself, him/herself, oneself).

    Reply
  146. Unimke Adie

    i watch a lot of animes, i think i've heard kimi, jibun, temee( mostly used when the character is furious or angry) 🙂 also, kisama, anata, omae. thats pretty much the ones i remember.

    Reply
  147. Rippleeffect

    Ooh! Very informative! And I do recognize most of those you's from anime lol. But I always thought that 自分 means 'myself' or 'me' though? Also, I think the last 3 min or so of the video was a repeat of the front part and I'm not sure if you did it on purpose…

    Reply
  148. Cali

    I know 'Anata' Anta' 'Kimi' 'Omae' 'Jibun' 'Onushi' 'Temee' 'Kisama' 'Otaku' … These are all of the 'YOU's I know and have learned.

    Reply
  149. Cali

    Question: If you are learning japanese, but are not from japan, is there recommended dialect(s) to learn? Or a certain way to speak? I am from America (USA) and I consider myself southern but western too (southwest). Is there a certain dialect I should learn that would fit the way I might speak or sound when speaking Japanese?

    Reply
  150. Kare

    I have just a tiny handful of brain cells left so I think it's best if I don't use them up remembering words I shouldn't use. :o) This was a very useful and enlightening lesson.

    Reply
  151. Owie

    I am really confused. If I was talking to my friends what one would I use? I couldn't use 'Kimi' Because all my friends are older than me and I wouldn't like to look Stuck up, I wouldn't really want to use Omae because I remember a few videos ago Yuta Said that In a movie (In Japanese) a villan/Gangster would use it. Finally You said Anta was Kind of Rude if you used it in the wrong way. If anyone could help me I would be grateful. Thanks 🙂

    Reply
  152. Rohit

    Hey Yuta,

    from watching anime, I'd come to think that "anata" almost meant "dear" in English. Am I mistaking it for a different word? Thanks for the lesson as always.

    Reply
  153. Ángel

    Hello Yuta, i´m from México and i like your videos because i can learn english and japanese at the same time. Also i like anime, is for that i can understand some words, but the kanji is so difficult. I´m only know hiragana and katakana but i dont have somebody to talk and practice.
    Thanks for your lessons!

    Reply
  154. Ángel

    Hello Yuta, i´m from México and i like your videos because i can learn english and japanese at the same time. Also i like anime, is for that i can understand some words, but the kanji is so difficult. I´m only know hiragana and katakana but i dont have somebody to talk and practice.
    Thanks for your lessons!

    Reply

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